Gary Cantor, Durham Medical Researcher, Wants You to Live for Centuries

Gary CantorFrom his perspective, Gary Cantor, Durham medical researcher, is exactly where he always knew he would end up. These days, he spends his time studying for his Ph.D while also working hard to conduct cutting edge medical research. He started down that road at the tender age of 13, when he was traveling around the Internet and discovered a YouTube video of Dr. Aubrey de Grey, a very prominent biomedical gerontologist. Dr. de Grey believes so strongly in medical research that he will tell anyone who will listen that enough knowledge about the human body can increase human life expectancy to as much as 1,000 years.

That spoke to Gary Cantor, and he’s tried hard to follow that same track. That is why, when he went to the University of Florida as a teenager, he worked in his first lab and why he was a summer intern in the Translational Oncology department at Genentech in San Francisco during his first year in college. There, he worked on a team that was investigating a very important treatment for breast cancer and that simply whet his appetite for more. He became Gary Cantor, Durham researcher when he applied for and was accepted into the Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program (BBSP) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, which is just down the road from Durham.

Gary Cantor Durham’s Beliefs on Aging

Gary Cantor

Gary Cantor Durham has always held an interest in helping people. Giving hope to the hopeless is what first drew him to the idea of becoming a medical doctor. The idea first occurred to him as a young boy when watching the popular 90s television series Trauma: Life in the ER. In that show, Gary Cantor Durham saw how diligently doctors worked to help their patients and that aspect of helping the hopeless appealed to him.

Durham would later be introduced to Dr. Aubrey De Grey, a Biomedical Gerontologist who firmly believes that through research it is possible that the first person to live to be 1,000 is already alive. That thought forever changed Gary Cantor Durham’s life. He became intensely interested in the field of molecular biology and anti-aging thoughts.

Growing up, Gary Durham was an avid chess player. He won the chess championship at his junior high school the only two years he competed and was active in a number of different sports. In high school he would go on to play golf, soccer, football, and run track and field. He also practiced Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Krav Maga, and did weightlifting. Today, though, Gary Cantor Durham is a part of the Genetics and Molecular Biology Department at the University of North Carolina, where he is a 4th year Ph.D. candidate.

Healthcare Research is the Key – Gary Cantor

From the time he was a young boy growing up in Coral Springs, Florida, Gary Cantor always wanted a career in medicine, although at first he thought he wanted to be a surgeon. His love of medicine came from a TV show addiction, to a medical reality show. That show made him realize that he wanted to give hope to the hopeless and save people’s lives and the best way to do that would be to go into medicine, especially as a surgeon. At least at first, that’s what he wanted. However, that particular dream wouldn’t last long.

Gary Cantor was about 13 when he came across a YouTube video that changed everything for him. The video was posted by biomedical gerontologist Dr. Aubrey de Grey, who believed that medical research could create conditions and improve healthcare to the point that humans could possibly live for 1,000 years. He corresponded with Dr. DeGrey for a while and decided that his calling was to go into the medical research field.

After high school, he earned a biology degree at the University of Florida. While he was there, he set the course for the rest of his life. Not only did he work on his first lab while still in his teens, but he also traveled to San Francisco to complete a four-month research internship at Genentech, as part of their Translational Oncology team, where he worked on innovative breast cancer treatment. These days, Gary Cantor, Durham researcher, a Ph.D. candidate at the University of North Carolina, where he also works in their Genetics and Molecular Biology Department. Still only in his 20s, he is just getting started.

Active youth for Gary Cantor

Gary Cantor — currently a resident of Durham, N.C. — had an active childhood in Coral Springs, Fla. It was there that he learned a love of medicine and grew a desire for research in the future. But he was also an avid chess player as a child, winning the chess championship in junior high during two different years. He was also quite active in various sports. During high school, he participated in golf, football, soccer, weightlifting and ran track and field. Outside the classroom setting, he practiced Brazilian Jiu Jit. And alongside his father, Gary Cantor took Krav Maga lessons as well.

Gary Cantor’s Life in Medical Research

For Gary Cantor, Durham is a gold mine for medical research. He has been a medical researcher for many years, since he studied biology at the University of Florida and started working with his first lab when he was still a teenager. One summer, he also went to San Francisco for four months, where he worked as an intern for Genentech in their Translational Oncology department as part of a team looking into a very important treatment for breast cancer.

Gary Cantor always dreamed of a career in medicine. He started wanting to be a great surgeon, but at age 13, he saw a YouTube video of biomedical gerontologist Dr. Aubrey de Grey, who firmly believes that medical research could create life expectancies of as much as 1,000 years.

These days, from Gary Cantor’s Durham home base, he sees the human body as an advanced computer and believes that anyone with knowledge of its instruction manual (genome), can possibly make the computer run forever. Still only 26 and a Ph.D. candidate, Gary Cantor is just starting to move medical science forward.

Gary Cantor, Durham

Even when he was a young boy in Coral Springs, Florida, Gary Cantor knew he wanted a career in the medical field. He watched “Trauma: Life in the ER,” a medical TV reality show, as much as he can. Back then, he wanted to be a surgeon because it looked really cool. It was as if surgeons were the coolest doctors in the hospital. That impression was challenged when he was 13, though, and he came upon a video from Dr. Aubrey de Grey. A biomedical gerontologist, Dr. de Grey seemed certain that medical research could create life expectancies as high as 1,000 years.

Gary Cantor conducted a correspondence with Dr. de Grey for some time and became convinced that medical research was even cooler than surgery. When the time came, he studied biology at the University of Florida and became a medical researcher early on, working in his first lab while still a teenager. He also traveled to San Francisco for a four-month internship with Genentech, in their Translational Oncology department. There, he worked on a research team that was looking into a very important treatment for breast cancer.

After Florida, Cantor was excited to be accepted into the Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program (BBSP) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he also joined the university’s Genetics and Molecular Biology Department. To Gary Cantor, Durham is now home. He is currently a fourth-year Ph.D. candidate at the tender age of 26, which means he will probably be helping to move medical science forward for many years to come.

A Career Against Aging

Once the theory of research for the cure to aging was introduced to Gary Cantor by Dr. Aubrey de Grey, he was inspired with what he wanted to do for a career. Cantor found a correlation to the process that computers survived by could be applied to the human body. By approaching medical research in this manner of technology meets biology, Cantor has been able to hone in on his ideas in the medical research community.

From an early age, Gary Cantor knew that he wanted to work in the medical field in some way. As a child, he would watch shows like “Trauma: Life in the ER.” Shows like this inspired him and by watching the medical staff work so diligently to save people’s lives, he knew that he wanted to grow up to do that: give hope to the hopeless. At that point, he thought he would work to be a surgeon.

When he got older, he stumbled upon a Youtube video of Dr. Aubrey de Grey and discovered the world of Biomedical Gerontology. This discovery refocused him to pursue a career that would give people hope for longer, healthier lives not through surgery but through research. He was later accepted into the Biological and Biomedical Sciences Program (also known as BBSP) at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He then went on to join the Genetics and Molecular Biology department where he is currently a fourth year PH. D. candidate.